Losing Rose

Rose is in a terrible place, rarely far from death. They’ve been hospitalised many times since their near death experience in December. There was such a sense of celebration when they came out of hospital and it was so misplaced. Physical and mental health have cycled through chronic crises. It’s brutal.

Rose and I are no longer a couple.

They didn’t come home to me. Nearly dying blew wide every crack in our relationship. Every effort we both made to find a bridge between us was swamped. They proposed and ran from me. All the demons woke up. The only glimpses of peace to be found were when I took myself out of the picture and left Rose and Poppy together on a beautiful autumn day. I hoped patience would heal us but the longer I held on, the further down Rose fell.

So I let go and life took us to some un dreamed of place where the foundations broke beyond repair and for months I woke to the nightmare that they’re gone. The new normal.

Rose found love with someone else, found peace and a sense of safety that couldn’t be found with me anymore. I am so happy for them. I so want them to be okay, to feel safe, to feel loved. I am so confused and heartbroken. They are so confused and heartbroken. Nothing makes sense. We try to make time to talk but every day is torn apart by medical appointments, new infections, new allergies, medication changes, intense rehab, the fallout of trauma. No conversation is finished, few are even started. I think of the weeks spent rubbing their hands and feet and wonder if in some strange way I smell like the hospital, like death and terror and paralysis, drowning slowly in the shrill beeping hell of ICU. There’s no words for this. Their mind is fractured and ravaged. I’m replaced. I hate them. I love them. I accept what I cannot change.

I cry every day for months. Everyone wants someone to blame. I find myself defending everyone. Poppy gets a cold that lasts weeks and Rose is forbidden by doctors to be near her because they are so vulnerable now to respiratory illness. The distance drives them insane, tears their heart apart. After 4 weeks of staying apart, Rose is hospitalised with pneumonia anyway, then has anaphylaxis to one of the antibiotics. No one’s body, it turns out, can be on these massive doses for this long without becoming sensitized. Rose’s heart and mind are stripped so raw the lightest touch burns, triggers pile up and overlap, flashbacks descend like lightning storms and the nightmares rise like black floodwaters full of dead things. They are tormented by the fear it would have been better if they’d died, and it’s a mind virus resistant to nebulous hopes of a different from planned but still bright future.

My friends and family hold onto me and I hold onto Poppy. I flip my life around as a single parent. Gradually my capacity returns; I can wash dishes, cook meals, be present, plan adventures and crafts, go hours without falling apart. Plug the holes in the boat, make new plans, test new adventures.

Hate the circumstances and don’t hang blame where there isn’t culpability.

Fury at the situation eases my self hate. I can breathe again. It’s not fair and it’s not my fault. Sometimes life is just hard.

Let go of everything I can’t have. My lover, my beloved growing old alongside me. The family, waking in bed together in the mornings, holding each other tight after each fright and each good news. Let it go. Face what’s in front of me. Rose fighting for their life and not knowing what it will even look like anymore. Poppy needing a childhood that’s safe and adventurous and connected. Hold onto all our values and ideals. I can’t be half Poppy’s world anymore. I can’t work in the background knowing Rose is there with her, filling up that wonderful tank that needs connection and attention and delight and fun. I can’t be half a parent. Step up. Show up, count my blessings, hold tight onto everything good and beautiful and precious. Fight like hell for it. I nearly missed out on this. Let go and hold on.

Rose swims and drowns. I am no longer the carer in the middle of their story. I watch from the sidelines, try to throw life savers. Grieve. Train my mind to stop going over every conversation, looking for the place it went wrong or what I could have done differently. Stay focused. If I drown too, so does Poppy. You can have an existential crisis or you can have a life. Choose wisely. Hold tight.

I don’t know what happens next. I’ve found I don’t really get used to the scares. I want to be home and nearby when things are bad even when I’m not welcome to visit. Old habits. When things get very black for Rose I struggle to sleep, to think clearly, to be grounded. A fog descends that makes daily life so hard to manage. The terror fades into the background but it never goes away. In some ways I’m still waiting for them to come back from a war. I have to keep finding my way into the new world, creating it every day. Building on new habits, creating the security, the consistency, the patterns and connections and community that buffer us from these storms.

We are all losing who Rose was, and they don’t have words for this. No one can come through these experiences unchanged, and right now change is their only constant. They are in flux. They are in torment. They are in love, in pain, in the middle of it all, bound up with death and life and hope and dreams and grief and loss. They are profoundly lost and struggling towards a new future they can’t envision. We may yet bury Rose this year, or Rose may emerge in some new form, to a new life. None of us yet know the ending of this story. Whatever the ending, I must live with it, and Poppy must live with it.

There’s grief and shock and sorrow. Rage, despair, pain.

And there’s acceptance. Grace. Love. We accept the things we cannot change. We let go of what we cannot have. We hold onto what’s precious and in front of us. Over, and over again. We face life with as much love, courage, compassion, and humour as possible. Let go. Hold on.

6 thoughts on “Losing Rose

  1. I have been reading your posts for years but never had the confidence to reply but now I want to say that I am sending healing vibes to someone who has helped me in ways they will never know the depth of. All my love to you and family xx

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    • on an aside – I like it you speak of Poppy’s need to be connected. I find the term attachment problematic – although some will say that says more about me…

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