Inks

What have I been up to? Today, apart from doing a great deal of packing, a little online gaming to relax, and some cooking and cleaning, I’ve been looking into inks. I have a little money set aside from the sale of artwork last year and I’ve decided that I need to branch out and broaden my fountain pen ink collection. Currently most of my work is produced with a single ink colour Noodlers Air Corp Blue Black. I purchased a bottle about three years ago and fell in love with the magnificent depth of colour and array of blue greens tones I can get out of the one bottle simply by watering the colour. Most of my ink paintings have been done with just this one ink, the colour undiluted is almost black, and fades out to the softest teal. (here it is, still a bit wet)

So I’ve been reading a lot of reviews about inks! If you are also interested in fountain pen inks, check out Pendamonium, an Australian online store with a good range of Noodlers Inks. You may also find The Fountain Pen Network full of interesting information. I follow a blog called Inkophile that often has useful reviews of different products. And I’m seriously investigating the samples available from The Goulet Pen Company, which would give me a week or two with each colour I order before I decide on those I’ll buy in the full size. They offer a deal where for $12.50 a month they’ll send you five random ink samples, which if I was a bit more flush I’d take up in a heartbeat! They also stock the Noodlers Flex Nib fountain pen for $15, which is simply incredible. Not the easiest kind of pen to use, but I think it’s well worth me having a play with it considering that my preferred style of ink painting is pen and ink work then brush work. I have painted with brush only, using drawing inks (these cannot be used in fountain pens) such as in this range:

Whilst I really do enjoy that also, I am very comfortable with my fountain pen, and I love the constant transition between poetry and art with it.

I’d love to explore some red inks, there’s a stunning range of orange/gold/fire coloured inks, and a fascinating collection of near blacks with different tones such as green or purple that I suspect would lend themselves well to the type of ink painting I do. I’m also vaguely tempted to stock up on my favourite blue black in case one day I can’t get hold of it – that would bring me to tears. 🙂 I love complex colours with a tendency to shade in different complementary tones. Some people prefer inks with no shading and a flat true tone, but the variations so appeal to me with my kind of art.

I brought my fountain pen – a fairly cheap Parker pen, a number of years ago after placing second in a poetry competition and winning $150 in prize money. I was terribly nervous that I would lose it accidentally, but I so loved them and dearly wanted one so I took the risk. Many years later it is still with me, I write almost every day with it in my journal and use it in a lot of my art. It’s very dear to me and I’m very excited by the prospect of having a larger range of inks to use in it. The thought of really putting some time into some haiga with it is really tickling my fancy.

I’d also quite like to experiment sometime with some different types of papers to see how the pen and ink display on each, so I’m keeping my eye out for paper samples too. There’s a few that are frequently recommended, maybe I’ll splash out and order a notepad. 

4 thoughts on “Inks

  1. Oh, I think most of the fountain pen/ink aficionados are writers rather than artists, who prefer the handwritten form. You never know, you might find a fountain pen and a delicious shade of ink brings out something new in your writing! Scrawling with a scratchy blobby pen is deeply frustrating, whereas a smooth wet pen that glides and a luscious quick drying ink with lovely shades in it makes the handwritten word even more beautiful and tickles poems out of me when the process is such a joy. 🙂

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  2. fascimating, partly because it's so far outside my field; we writers do not have that brich variety of materials to work with, only words 😦

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